Engineering vs Designing

A fantastic description of what is wrong with some companies in how they create things.  I’ve been really disappointed with a number of products I’ve tried or even purchased recently because so much of it had a half-assed feel.

It’s not that the NFC-based, phone-to-object interaction didn’t work. Of course it did: it had been engineered perfectly. But what it hadn’t been was designed. Those responsible for imagining the interaction apparently wanted to protect users against the (edge case!) contingency of someone making off with their phones and running up a huge vending-machine tab. They failed to understand that, for low-value transactions like this, at least, the touch gesture is a useful proxy for consent — and that if someone’s got physical possession of my phone, I’m likely to have bigger problems than whether or not they order a few cans of Coke with it. A designer committed to the user and the quality of that user’s experience gets this in a way only the rarest engineer seems to. Designers are also, by training and predilection, inclined to design for the usual, where engineers are taught a kind of rigor that compels them to account for, and overweight, low-probability events.

This example really sums up the issue with a lot of companies.

Read more at http://speedbird.wordpress.com/2011/02/19/nokia-culture-will-out/

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