If you find yourself in the business of creating and testing Helm charts, or you simply want to try one out, then Colima with its built in Kubernetes functionality may be for you. In this post I am going to walk through how to quickly get going with Colima’s Kubernetes integration and an ingress controller for basic Helm chart testing.

I assume you already have Colima and Helm installed and are familiar with the tools and Kubernetes itself. If this is you then continue reading!

For this post I am using Colima 0.4.4, k3s v1.23.6+k3s1, helm 3.9.3 and ingress-nginx 4.2.0. I often find myself creating Helm charts and I want to test my modifications locally before committing my changes. Once in a while I also want to quickly test an available helm chart without messing up an existing Kubernetes installation. In these cases I will create a Colima instance with Kubernetes enabled and install my preferred ingress controller, nginx-ingress.

To get started, ensure that no other colima instances are running using colima list followed by a colima stop <name of profile> for any running instances. You should also ensure that there are no other services running on your system that are opening ports, especially 80, 443 and 3306. This helps ensure your test instance doesn’t interfere with any existing colima instances or other services. Then, issue colima start helm-test --kubernetes -m4 to start a colima instance with 4GB memory and Kubernetes enabled. Once colima has finished creating the instance you can add the ingress-nginx helm repository if you don’t already have it with helm repo add ingress-nginx https://kubernetes.github.io/ingress-nginx followed by helm repo update. You can now install ingress-nginx using helm install -n ingress-nginx --create-namespace --set controller.ingressClassResource.default=true ingress-nginx ingress-nginx/ingress-nginx. This command will install ingress-nginx and set it as the default ingress class for the cluster. At this point you have basic installation of Kubernetes with an ingress controller which will allow you to test most Helm charts.

As a test, you could now create a brand new helm chart with helm create nginx. Edit the resulting values.yaml file and enable ingress then install the chart into your new test cluster. You should see that it is able to download and install the default nginx image and create the proper ingress rule automatically. For my test I used helm install -n default nginx .. Before long you should see this as an ingress record:

kubectl get ingress nginx
NAME    CLASS   HOSTS                 ADDRESS        PORTS   AGE
nginx   nginx   chart-example.local   192.168.5.15   80      54s

Despite what the Address column says, the chart is now available at 127.0.0.1. Create a hosts entry and you will be able to get the default nginx page.

Of course, you can use or test other charts too. Here I will install bitnami’s MySQL chart with the following settings in a yaml file

## MySQL Authentication parameters
##
auth:
  ## MySQL root password
  ## ref: https://github.com/bitnami/bitnami-docker-mysql#setting-the-root-password-on-first-run
  ##
  rootPassword: "password"
  ## MySQL custom user and database
  ## ref: https://github.com/bitnami/bitnami-docker-mysql/blob/master/README.md#creating-a-database-on-first-run
  ## ref: https://github.com/bitnami/bitnami-docker-mysql/blob/master/README.md#creating-a-database-user-on-first-run
  ##
  database: "blog"
  username: "wordpress"
  password: "password"
##
primary:
  persistence:
    ## If true, use a Persistent Volume Claim, If false, use emptyDir
    ##
    enabled: false
  service:
    ## @param primary.service.type MySQL Primary K8s service type
    ##
    type: LoadBalancer
##
secondary:
  ## Number of MySQL Secondary replicas to deploy
  ##
  replicaCount: 0

I install the bitnami repo using helm repo add https://charts.bitnami.com/bitnami followed by helm repo update to ensure I have the latest info. To install a copy of MySQL with my settings file I use helm install -f mysql.yaml mysql bitnami/mysql. After a short while MySQL will be installed and also available on localhost through k3s’ built in LoadBalancer system. Notice in the mysql.yml file I specified I asked the chart to install the primary instance of MySQL with a LoadBalancer based service instead of the default ClusterIP.

When you are finished testing a simple colima delete helm-test will remove your testing environment and free up resources.

Hopefully you see now how quickly and easily you can get going with Colima and its Kubernetes integration to get a local Kubernetes cluster up and running for testing. The Kubernetes integration Colima uses is very capable and well suited to learning and testing. Enjoy!

Chris Wiegman asks, what are you building? I thought this would be a fun question to answer today. Like a lot of people I have a number of things in flight but I’ll try to limit myself to just a few them.

PiPlex

I have run Plex in my house for a few years to serve up my music collection. In 2021 I also started paying for Plex Pass which gives me additional features. One of my favorite features or add-ons is PlexAmp which gives me a similar to Spotify like experience but for music I own.

Although I’m very happy with the Plex server I have I wondered if it would be feasible to run Plex on a Raspberry Pi. I also wanted to learn how Pi OS images were generated using pi-gen. With that in mind I set out to create a Pi OS image that preinstalls Plex along with some additional tools like Samba to make it easy to get up and running with a Plex server. I named the project PiPlex. I don’t necessarily plan on replacing my existing Plex server with a Pi based solution but the project did serve its intended goal. I learned a bit about how Pi OS images are created and I discovered that it is quite possible to create a Pi based Plex server.

ProxySQL Helm Chart

One of the most exciting things I’ve learned in the past two years or so is Kubernetes. While it is complex it is also good answer to some equally complex challenges in hosting and scaling some apps. My preferred way of managing apps on Kubernetes is Helm.

One app I want install and manage is ProxySQL. I couldn’t find a good Helm chart to get this done so I wrote one and it is available at https://github.com/dustinrue/proxysql-kubernetes. To make this Helm chart I first had to take the existing ProxySQL Docker image and rebuild it so it was built for x86_64 as well as arm64. Next I created the Helm chart so that it installs ProxySQL as a cluster and does the initial configuration.

Site Hosting

I’ve run my blog on WordPress since 2008 and the site has been hosted on Digital Ocean since 2013. During most of that time I have also used Cloudflare as the CDN. Through the years I have swapped the droplets (VMs) that host the site, changed the operating system and expanded the number of servers from one to two in order to support some additional software. The last OS change was done about three years ago and was done to swap from Ubuntu to CentOS 7.

CentOS 7 has served me well but it is time to upgrade it to a more recent release. With the CentOS 8 controversy last year I’ve decided to give one of the new forks a try. Digital Ocean offers Rocky Linux 8 and my plan is to replace the two instances I am currently running with a single instance running Rocky Linux. I no longer have a need for two separate servers and if I can get away with hosting the site on a single instance I will. Back in 2000 it was easy to run a full LAMP setup (and more) on 1GB of memory but it’s much more of a challenge today. That said, I plan to use a single $5 instance with 1 vCPU and 1GB memory to run a LEMP stack.

Cloudflare

Speaking of Cloudflare, did you know that Cloudflare does not cache anything it deems “dynamic”? PHP based apps are considered dynamic content and HTML output by software like WordPress is not cached. To counter this, I created some page rules a few years ago that forces Cloudflare to cache pages, but not the admin area. Combined with the Cloudflare plug-in this solution has worked well enough.

In the past year, however, Cloudflare introduced their automatic platform optimization option that targets WordPress. This feature enables the perfect mix of default rules (without using your limited set of rules) for caching a WordPress site properly while breaking the cache when you are signed in. This is also by far the cheapest and most worry free way to get the perfect caching setup for WordPress and I highly recommend using the feature. It works so well I went ahead and enabled it for this site.

Multi-Architecture Docker Images

Ever since getting a Raspberry Pi 4, and when rumors of an Arm powered Mac were swirling, I’ve been interested in creating multi-architecture Docker images. I started with a number of images I use at work so they are available for both x86_64 and arm64. In the coming weeks I’d like to expand a bit on how to build multi-architecture images and how to replace Docker Desktop with a free alternative.

Finishing Up

This is just a few of the things I’m working on. Hopefully in a future post I can discuss some of the other stuff I’m up to. What are you building?

Successful connection test

In this post I’m going to review how I installed Rundeck on Kubernetes and then configured a node source. I’ll cover the installation of Rundeck using the available helm chart, configuration of persistent storage, ingress, node definitions and key storage. In a later post I’ll discuss how I setup a backup job to perform a backup of the server hosting this site.

For this to work you must have a Kubernetes cluster that allows for ingress and persistent storage. In my cluster I am using nginx-ingress-controller for ingress and freenas-iscsi-provisioner. The freenas-iscsi-provisioner is connected to my FreeNAS server and creates iSCSI based storage volumes. It is set as my default storage class. You will also need helm 3 installed.

With the prerequisites out of the way we can get started. First, add the helm chart repository by following the directions on located on https://hub.helm.sh/charts/incubator/rundeck. Once added, perform the following to get the values file so we can edit it:

helm show values incubator/rundeck > rundeck.yaml
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